Hinduism Today's New Web Site

The next issue of Hinduism Today is in the final days of editing and design at the monastery. It reminded us to share news of our newly redesigned website.

The editorial excellence of Hinduism Today magazine can now be seen online in a modern interface with enhanced organization, interactivity, moving graphics and many more resources than before. It’s now easier to read, navigate and have your say. You can comment on any article you read, and see the opinions of others. Plus, you can download any issue as a PDF to enjoy on your computer, with all the visually stunning impact of the printed edition. All for free. With new navigation tools you can get the latest news from Hindu Press Internationa--and link to our Twitter page.

This next issue takes us all over the world, covering subjects seen in the word cloud here.

Easily peruse our publisher’s latest insights, his Introduction to Hinduism, our many videos and an archive of Hinduism Today going back 30 years. Enjoy the comments of renowned readers of the magazine, see a list of the latest lifetime subscribers and read an in-depth story about the magazine and how it is produced. See the best and most relevant Education Insight sections from the magazine in the What Is Hinduism? area of the site.

There is a great interview with Jill Taylor who found a higher state of mind one morning when she suffered a stroke, which she calls here “Stroke of Insight.”

Read and download the acclaimed series of lessons on Indian and Hindu history created for America’s sixth-grade students. You’ll also find an updated FAQ about Hinduism and Hinduism’s core beliefs. Join the Hindu renaissance by exploring Hinduism Today’s new website!

Hanapepe Peace Pole Finished

Work continued on the Peace Pole over the past retreat, scheduled to be delivered tomorrrow to the Hanapepe Matsunaga Peace Garden. After the hexagonal pole was roughed in with the chain saw and power planer, next it was finished off with Japanese planes. One of the placques is placed for position.

The top of the pole is pointed so that no birds will sit there.

Next, we routed in recesses for each of the six placques.

Test fit with the Japanese version of “May Peace Prevail On Earth.”

Next we use glue with epoxy to fasten them to the pole.

After oiling and making a simple stand the pole sits in front of Kadavul absorbing the shakti of Kadavul before going out to the community.

Underneath the Japanese there is a stainless steel plaque with Braille and a notice “Sponsored by the Interfaith Roundtable of Kauai” where the plan to create and put these poles into the community was born and nurtured.

Archives are now available through 2001. Light colored days have no posts. 1998-2001 coming later.

September 2009
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