Natha Masters' Discipline, Detachment and Siddhas

 a. Like most Asian masters, Kadaitswami taught more indirectly than intellectually. When a band of truant boys took to following and needling him, he did not send them away. Instead, when they were watching one day, he grabbed a flask of molten wax in a jeweler’s shop and drank from it. This so frightened the boys, they never bothered him again.

b. When a massive storm capsized the fishing boat of a devotee one dark night, Kadaitswami sensed the danger from afar. He rushed to the man’s house and sat in the rain-soaked yard, thrashing about as if rowing, much to the consternation of the man’s wife who watched from inside in fear. Later, she learned, her husband’s life had been mysteriously saved at that same time. c. SEE BELOW d. Honored as the guru of the land, Kadaitswami was unmoved by the adulation of the many or the animosity of the few. He lived simply, unto himself, accountable to none, aware of all. He would eat alone, among the crows, sharing his food with these creatures who, it is said, always call their clan to join.