Worship of the Gods

Kauai’s Iraivan Temple by Derick Glaskin

“Because it is relatively free from mistaken doctrines, the Hindu approach to life—and the Hindu approach to time and the Hindu approach to worry, and the Hindu approach to the subconscious mind—is very different from the Western approach. The Hindu knows that he is evolving through a succession of lives on the planet, and he is not in a hurry. The devout Hindu accumulates little karma, because his subconscious is constantly being brought current by the worship of the Gods. Thus, karma is controlled. The Hindu looks at religion as the most joyous expression life can offer. The Hindu considers all of mankind his brothers and sisters, all created by the same Creator, all destined to the same attainment. ¶When he visits the temple, he is seeking to understand the minds of the Gods, seeking their blessings and their guidance. He stands before the Deity in humble awe of the grandeur of a world he can only partially conceive. He inwardly tries to sense the Deity. If he is even slightly clairvoyant, he may see the Deity overshadow the image within the sanctum. At first he may see the image appear to move, thinking it his own imagination. He may observe the expression on the Deity change from day to day and from hour to hour. He may become aware of the Deity’s influence in his life and awaken a love for the Gods whom he once only vaguely thought were plausible. ¶The Hindu is not an existentialist. He does not believe that God is unknowable. He does not believe in the dismal fate of mankind alone in the universe, with only himself to depend upon. The Hindu believes that he is born with his destiny, and the patterns are set. He blends his will with the will of his religious community and with the will of the Gods in the temple, because he doesn’t have the concept of a free will that is answerable to neither man nor God. ¶Belief is a pattern placed within the mind for a particular purpose, so that awareness will flow through that particular pattern for the rest of the person’s life. Generally, the pattern is put into the mind of a child before he is thinking for himself, or your friends or family or teachers will put beliefs in your mind. You will say, “Yes, I believe that,” without actually thinking it out for yourself. It is from our beliefs that our attitudes arise. Your individual awareness, your ability to be aware, has no way of functioning unless there are patterns within the mind for the prāṇas to flow through and around. You have to have a mind to work through. ¶First there are beliefs, and then attitudes. In the Hindu home and culture, beliefs and attitudes are taught very carefully and systematically, with love and attention, so that the individual becomes a productive member of the community even before leaving home. Those first mind impressions are important, and if they are correct and not fraught with misconceptions, they will properly guide the person through life with a minimum of mental and emotional problems. The person will correct himself or herself rather than having to be corrected by society.” MWS 137

A Visit From a Hawaiian High Priestess

Today the monastery enjoyed a visit from Leimomi Mo'okini Lum. She is the soon-to-be 93 year old, Hawaiian Priestess who originally presented Gurudeva with the Kuloulou Staff. The staff still sits to the right of the Guru Pitam, opposite to Satguru's Silver Danda. She is currently doing wonderful work to restore and utilize a large Heiau—an ancient Hawaiian Temple—on the big island. You'll note that Leimomi is currently in a wheel chair, but it's not because she's too old to walk, it's because she hurt her ankle while hiking! We have much to learn from this bright soul.

"Kulou" means to "bow the head," for the Kuloulou Staff is considered one of the most sacred Hawaiian symbols. Today Leimomi replaced the special Hawaiian cloth which covers the staffs spherical top. While here she also enjoyed a tour of Iraivan Temple and a visit to the Media Studio to "talk story" with the monks there.

A Final Art Submission

The final submission for our upcoming yet-to-be-revealed publication. This is a painting done by Jaipur painter Kailash Raj. We've chosen this beautiful work as the publication's cover art

When you seek a guru,
Seek one who is holy and pure
And then give him your all—
Your body, life and wealth.
Then in constancy learn clearly,
Not a moment distracting.
Surely shall you thus reach Siva’s State.
Placing His Feet on my head,
The Master blessed me. He is the holy guru.
He my Self Realization works.
He takes the jiva to the state beyond tattvas.
He sunders my bonds.
All these he performs— He that is Truth itself.

Tirumantiram Verses 1693 & 2049

Archives are now available through 2001. Light colored days have no posts. 1998-2001 coming later.

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